JUMP CUT
A REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

Notes

1. During the Cold War, the West recognized Eastern Europe solely in terms of dissident discourse about Communism’s repression of (dear to the liberal democracies) civil rights. Repressed subjectivity, in dissident discourse, became the sole point of critical entry into the Communist regime. However, Communism is no longer a threat to Romania. Putin is not Lenin but a neoliberal oligarch as is Jeff Bezos the owner of Amazon or Bill Gates the owner of Microsoft. The threat instead is neoliberalism, yet old habits die hard. Betrayed by Communism’s broken promise about a humane society, dissident discourse re-appropriates the humanism of the repressed subject to mount a critique of Communism while it glosses over the oppressive conditions of subjectivity today. In fact, Romanian today looks like any other East European neoliberal state. As a member of the EU and NATO, Romania hosts the U. S. Patriot Defense Missile system directed at Russia. Along Poland, Romanian also hosts CIA “Black Sites.” Romanian national debt in 2006 was 12,30% of GDP in 2017 is 37.1% of GDP. [return to page 1]

2. Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009), 6.

3. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 144.

4. Dominique Nasta, Contemporary Romanian Cinema. The History of an Unexpected Miracle, London: Wallflowers Press, 2013. 196.

5. Film Catcher interview with Cristian Mungiu at the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F7YzgdAJErA(Accessed October 3, 2017)

6. Richard Port, “Not Just an Abortion Film: An Interview with Cristian Mungiu,” Cineaste, Vol. 33, No. 2 (2008). 37

7. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 201.

8. Kristin M. Jones, “Review: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days,” Film Comment (January/February 2008)
https://www.filmcomment.com/article/review-4-months-3-weeks-and-2-days-cristian-mungiu/ (Accessed October 3, 2017)

9. Iona Uricaru, “4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days: The Corruption of Intimacy.” In Film Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 4 (2008). 16.

10. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 201.

11. Dominique Nasta, Contemporary Romanian Cinema. The History of an Unexpected Miracle, London: Wallflowers Press, 2013. 191.

12. Kristin M. Jones, “Review: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days,” Film Comment (January/February 2008)
 https://www.filmcomment.com/article/review-4-months-3-weeks-and-2-days-cristian-mungiu/ (Accessed October 3, 2017)

13. Damon Smith, “Once Upon a Time in Romania,” Filmmaker, Vol. 16, No. 2. (2008).
http://filmmakermagazine.com/archives/issues/winter2008/4months.php#.WbR5Kq2ZOek (Accessed October 3, 2017)

14. Ann Hornaday, “ ‘4 Months’: A Time and Place Brought Unerringly to Life,” Washington Post (February 1, 2008).
 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/31/AR2008013103627.html (Accessed October 3, 2017)

15. Stephanie Bunbury, “Cannes glory for new voice”, New York Times (May 29, 2007). (Accessed October 3, 2017)
http://roconsulboston.com/Pages/InfoPages/Culture/Film/Mungiu4Months.html

16. Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009). 6.

17. David Lynch, thecityofabsurdity.com http://www.thecityofabsurdity.com/bluevelvet/bvabout.html Accessed October 3, 2017).

18. Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009), 6.

19. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 201.

20. Maurizio Lazzarato, The Making of the Indebted Man. Semiotext(e), 2012. 25. [return to page 2]

21. Friedrich Nietzsche, Basic Writings of Nietzsche. New York: The Modern Library, 1968. 499.

22. Friedrich Nietzsche, Basic Writings of Nietzsche. New York: The Modern Library, 1968. 507.

23. Friedrich Nietzsche, Basic Writings of Nietzsche. New York: The Modern Library, 1968. 501.

24. Gilles Deleuze, and Felix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus. Capitalism and Schizophrenia. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005. 80.

25. Michel Foucault, The Birth of Biopolitics. Lectures at the College de France 1978-1979. London: Palgrave 2008. 226.

26. Doru Pop “Rape and Sexual Violence in Contemporary Romanian Cinema,” Cine-Excess. http://www.cine-excess.co.uk/rape-and-sexual-violence-in-contemporary-romanian-cinema.html (Accessed August 3, 2017).

27. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 227.

28. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 159.

29. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 169.

30. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 171.

31. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 170.

32. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 194.

33. Quoted in Maurizio Lazzarato, The Making of the Indebted Man. Semiotext(e), 2012.
13.

34. George Duby, The Early Growth of European Economy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1978. 119.

35. Benjamin Walter, Illuminations. New York: Schocken Books, 1968. 256.

36. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 181.

37. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 181.

38. Katharine Verdery, What Was Socialism, and What Comes Next?, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1996. 181.

39. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 200.

40. George Duby, The Early Growth of European Economy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1978. 119.

41. Gail Kligman, “Political Demography: The Banning of Abortion in Ceausescu’s Romania,” In Ginsburg, Faye D. and Rapp, Rayan (eds.) Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995. 234.

42. Gail Kligman, “Political Demography: The Banning of Abortion in Ceausescu’s Romania,” In Ginsburg, Faye D. and Rapp, Rayan (eds.) Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995. 245.

43. Richard Port, “Not just an Abortion Film: An Interview with Christian Mungiu,” Cineaste, Vol. 33, No. 2, (Spring 2008). 5.

44. Maria Bucur, Eugenics and Modernization in Interwar Romania, Pittsburg: University of Pittsburg Press, 2010. 10. 

45. Marius Turda, The History of East-Central European Eugenics, 1900-1945, Sources and Commentaries, New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015. 302.

46. Marius Turda, “Controlling the National Body. Ideas of Racial Purification in Romania, 1918-1944,” In Christian Promitzer, Sevasti Trubeta and Marius Turda (eds.) Health, Hygiene and Eugenics in Southeastern Europe to 1945. Budapest: CEU Press, 2011. 350.

47. Gail Kligman, “Political Demography: The Banning of Abortion in Ceausescu’s Romania,” In Ginsburg, Faye D. and Rapp, Rayan (eds.) Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995. 241.

48. David Graeber, Debt – The First 5,000 Years. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House Publishing, 2012. 2.

49. David Graeber, Debt – The First 5,000 Years. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House Publishing, 2012. 2.

50. Cornel Ban “Sovereign Debt, Austerity, and Regime Change: The Case of Nicolae Ceausescu’s Romania,” East European Politics and Societies and Culture, Vol. 26, No. (2012). 751.

51. Cornel Ban “Sovereign Debt, Austerity, and Regime Change: The Case of Nicolae Ceausescu’s Romania,” East European Politics and Societies and Culture, Vol. 26, No. (2012). 747.

52. Cornel Ban “Sovereign Debt, Austerity, and Regime Change: The Case of Nicolae Ceausescu’s Romania,” East European Politics and Societies and Culture, Vol. 26, No. (2012). 751-2.

53. Gail Kligman, “Political Demography: The Banning of Abortion in Ceausescu’s Romania,” In Ginsburg, Faye D. and Rapp, Rayna (eds.) Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995. 238.

54. Gail Kligman, “Political Demography: The Banning of Abortion in Ceausescu’s Romania,” In Ginsburg, Faye D. and Rapp, Rayna (eds.) Conceiving the New World Order: The Global Politics of Reproduction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995. 243.

55. Cornel Ban “Sovereign Debt, Austerity, and Regime Change: The Case of Nicolae Ceausescu’s Romania,” East European Politics and Societies and Culture, Vol. 26, No. (2012). 765.

56. Perhaps Otilia embodies a part of Mungiu’s industrial genealogy. We learn that Otilia “came” to the “City” from Campulug, 65.5 km, or 1h 26 min drive away from the city of Brasov, the main industrial center of Ceausescu’s Romania. Brasov is also a university center for the technical sciences, which Ceausescu strategically established in 1971 by government decree to produce knowledge critical to Romania’s successful industrialization. As she mentions on two occasions, she studies technical sciences, suggesting that Brasov must be the city in the film, implying that her biography is linked to Romanian industry. [return to page 3]

57. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 127.

Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009), 4.

59. Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009), 4.

60. Dominique Nasta, Contemporary Romanian Cinema. The History of an Unexpected Miracle, London: Wallflowers Press, 2013. 197.

61. Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009), 4.

62. Constantin Parvulescu, “The cold world behind the window: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Romanian cinema’s return to real-existing communism,” Jump Cut. A Review of Contemporary Media, 51 (Spring 2009), 4.

63. Doru Pop, Romanian New Wave Cinema. An Introduction. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Press 2014. 204.

64. Elena Del Rio “Biopolitical Violence and Affective Force: Michael Haneke’s CODE UNKNOWN,” Post-Cinema Theorizing 21st-Century Film, Shana Denson and Julia Leyda (eds.), Sussex: REFRAMA Books, 2016. 553.