JUMP CUT
A REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

Notes

1. Patricia Mellencamp, “Situation Comedy, Feminism, and Freud: Discourses of Gracie and Lucy,” in Studies in Entertainment, ed. Tania Modleski (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1986), 80-95.

2. See Mary Ann Doane, The Desire to Desire: The Woman’s Film of the 1940s (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1987.) Also see Laura Mulvey, “Afterthoughts on ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’ Inspired by King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946),” in Feminism and Film Theory, ed. Constance Penley (New York: Routledge, 1988), 69-79).  

3. Ramona Curry lays out this interpretation in Too Much of a Good Thing: Mae West as Cultural Icon (Minneapolis and London: U of Minnesota P, 1996).

4. Lucy Fischer, “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child: Comedy and Matricide,” in Comedy/Cinema/Theory, ed. Andrew S. Horton (Berkeley: U of California P, 1991), 60-78. In the same vein, the absent mother and fear of women in comedy is Tania Modleski’s theme in “Three Men and Baby M,” in Feminism Without Women: Culture and Criticism in a “Postfeminist” Age (New York & London: Routledge, 1991), 76-89.

5. See Pamela Robertson’s description of the feminist tension with gay men about camp’s misogynist strains, included in her book that makes a definitive case for the power of feminist camp, Guilty Pleasures: Feminist Camp from Mae West to Madonna (Durham and London: Duke, 1996), 3-8.

6. Last Laughs: Perspectives on Women and Comedy, ed. Regina Barreca (New York, London, Paris, Montreaux, Tokyo, and Melbourne: Gordon and Breach, 1988); Women’s Comic Visions, ed. June Sochen (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1991); New Perspectives on Women and Comedy, ed. Regina Barreca (New York, London, Paris, Montreaux, Tokyo, and Melbourne: Gordon and Breach, 1992); Look Who’s Laughing: Gender and Comedy, ed. Gail Finney (London and New York: 1994).

7. Kristine Brunovska Karnick, “Commitment and Reaffirmation in Hollywood Romantic Comedy” and Tina Olsin Lent, “Romantic Love and Friendship: The Redefinition of Gender Relations in Screwball Comedy,” in Classical Hollywood Comedy, eds. Kristine Brunovska Karnick and Henry Jenkins (New York and London: Routledge, 1995), 123-46 and 314-31.

Works cited

Barreca, Regina, ed. Last Laughs: Perspectives on Women and Comedy. New York, London, Paris, Montreaux, Tokyo, and Melbourne: Gordon and Breach, 1988.

---. New Perspectives on Women and Comedy. New York, London, Paris, Montreaux, Tokyo, and Melbourne: Gordon and Breach, 1992.

Curry, Ramona. Too Much of a Good Thing: Mae West as Cultural Icon (Minneapolis and London: U of Minnesota P, 1996.

Doane, Mary Ann. The Desire to Desire: The Woman’s Film of the 1940s. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1987.

Finney, Gail, ed. Look Who’s Laughing: Gender and Comedy. London and New York: 1994.

Fischer, Lucy. “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child: Comedy and Matricide.” Comedy/Cinema/Theory.  Ed. Andrew S. Horton. Berkeley: U of California P, 1991. 60-78.

hooks, bell. Black Looks: Race and Representation. Boston: South End, 1992.

Karnick, Kristine Brunovska. “Commitment and Reaffirmation in Hollywood Romantic Comedy.” Classical Hollywood Comedy. Eds. Kristine Brunovska Karnick and Henry Jenkins. New York and London: Routledge, 1995. 123-46.

Karlyn, Kathleen Rowe. Unruly Girls, Unrepentant Mothers: Redefining Feminism on Screen. Austin: U of Texas P, 2011.

Lent, Tina Olsin. “Romantic Love and Friendship: The Redefinition of Gender Relations in Screwball Comedy.”  Classical Hollywood Comedy. Eds. Kristine Brunovska Karnick and Henry Jenkins. New York and London: Routledge, 1995. 314-31.

Little, Judy. Comedy and the Woman Writer: Woolf, Spark, and Feminism. Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1983.

Mellencamp, Patricia. “Situation Comedy, Feminism, and Freud: Discourses of Gracie and Lucy.” Studies in Entertainment. Ed. Tania Modleski. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana UP, 1986. 80-95.

Mizejewski, Linda. Pretty/Funny: Women Comedians and Body Politics. Austin: U of Texas P, 2014.

--- and Victoria Sturtevant, eds. Hysterical! Women in American Comedy. Austin: U of Texas P, 2017.

Modleski, Tania. “Three Men and Baby M.” Feminism Without Women: Culture and Criticism in a “Postfeminist” Age. New York & London: Routledge, 1991. 76-89.

Mulvey, Laura. “Afterthoughts on ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’ Inspired by King Vidor’s Duel in the Sun (1946).” Feminism and Film Theory. Ed. Constance Penley New York: Routledge, 1988. 69-79.  

Robertson, Pamela. Guilty Pleasures: Feminist Camp from Mae West to Madonna. Durham and London: Duke, 1996.

Rowe, Kathleen. “Comedy, Melodrama and Gender: Theorizing the Genres of Laughter.” Classical Hollywood Comedy. Eds. Kristine Brunovska Karnick and Henry Jenkins New York and London: Routledge, 1995. 39-59.

---. The Unruly Woman: Gender and the Genres of Laughter. Austin: U of Texas P, 1992.

Russo, Mary. The Female Grotesque: Risk, Excess, and Modernity. New York and London, Routledge, 1994.

Sochen, June, ed. Women’s Comic Visions. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1991.

Sturtevant, Victoria. A Great Big Girl Like Me: The Films of Marie Dressler. Urbana and Chicago: U of Illinois P, 2009.

Walker, Nancy A. “Toward Solidarity: Women’s Humor and Group Identity.” Women’s Comic Visions. Ed. June Sochen. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1991.

---. and Zita Dresner. Redressing the Balance: American Women's Literary Humor from Colonial Times to the 1980s. Eds. Nancy Walker and Zita Dresner. Jackson: UP of Mississippi, 1988.